Monday, February 28, 2011

Happy Tuesday!

Sometimes, the drab routine of day to day life just gets ever so boring. Predictable. No one ever says "Happy Tuesday!"... because what's so happy about it anyway? It's just like every other Tuesday.

Well, today, I'm here with an absolutely non-book related post (you see the break in routine thing I'm doing here?) to tell you...

HAPPY TUESDAY!

And what better way to celebrate this Tuesday then with some good-ol' Singing in the Rain. So jump up and click your heels today. Grin stupidly and sing at people. Yes, sing at them. (They may look at you like they think it's annoying, but really, you just made their day.)

The Extraordinary Secrets of April, May, and June by Robin Benway

Grade: A

Synopsis:
Three sisters share a magical, unshakable bond in this witty high-concept novel from the critically acclaimed author of Audrey, Wait! Around the time of their parents’ divorce, sisters April, May, and June recover special powers from childhood—powers that come in handy navigating the hell that is high school. Powers that help them cope with the hardest year of their lives. But could they have a greater purpose?

April, the oldest and a bit of a worrier, can see the future. Middle-child May can literally disappear. And baby June reads minds—everyone’s but her own. When April gets a vision of disaster, the girls come together to save the day and reconcile their strained family. They realize that no matter what happens, powers or no powers, they’ll always have each other.

Because there’s one thing stronger than magic: sisterhood.

Rating:
Character Development: 7/10
Originality: 8/10
Overall Enjoyment: 10/10
Ending: 10/10
Voice: 10/10
Plot: 6/10
Setting: 6/10
Total Score: 57/70

Obtained: Borrowed from Jill at Reading is Bliss

Age Appropriate? PG13
Cussing: Yep
Alcohol, Drugs, etc.: Yep, big party scene
Sexual Content: Mentioned
Disturbing Images/ Violence: Not much.

Review:
Well, I kind of loved this book a lot. Not only is it fun and entertaining, but it's genuinely heartfelt as well. The sibling relationships are totally believable. These girls annoy each other. Duh. They're sisters. That's what sisters do best... annoy each other. But each one of them would without a doubt jump in front of a bus for the other at any moment of any day.

There's also the conflict with the parents' recent divorce, and, of course, April, May, and Junes' newfound powers. Mostly, though, this book is about a family growing apart and coming back together again. The ups and downs of that sort of love. The parents make good appearances too, showing the strains and the worries of the divorce, but the underlying love that holds them all together.

April, May, and June were all unique characters. Their voices were differing as well, making for easy reading. Hooray for awesome writing skills! The dynamic between the three was so great. Realistic in a way that brought out my empathy, making me ache with sadness, but also smile and laugh out loud. Yes, laugh out loud. It's always awkward when you laugh out loud while reading. Ha. And the very fact that I'm laughing while reading makes me laugh even harder. Oh, the joys of literature...

The plot wasn't too intense, but it was always interesting. The little romances were absolutely adorable, as well. Basically, this book is a quirky outlook on the craziness of high school life and (if I haven't said it enough times already) of sisterhood.

LINKS:
Excerpt

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Clearing by Heather Davis

Grade: A

Synopsis:
Amy, a sixteen-year-old recovering from an abusive relationship, moves to the country to start a new life with her aunt–all she wants is for everything to be different. In the clearing at the back of Aunt Mae’s property, she makes an amazing discovery—Henry, a boy stuck in the endless summer of 1944. Henry and his world become Amy’s refuge and she begins to learn that some moments are worth savoring. But when the past and present come crashing together, both of them must find the courage to face what is meant to be, even if it means losing each other forever.

Rating:
Character Development: 8/10
Originality: 7/10
Overall Enjoyment: 9/10
Ending: 6/10
Voice: 10/10
Plot: 6/10
Setting: 10/10
Total Score: 56/70

Obtained: Library

Age Appropriate? PG13
Cussing: Some
Alcohol, Drugs, etc.: Yes, at a party. Main character doesn't take part, though.
Sexual Content: Discussed, but no explicit details
Disturbing Images/ Violence: Mentions of abuse

Review:
The Clearing isn't just a silly little teenage romance book. It's about growing up, learning how to love, and learning how to be strong even when it's the difficult thing to do. (Did I make that sound cheesy?) Because really, I appreciate the fact that the story has so many layers.

The imagery is so absolutely vivid it is impossible not to feel a part of this story. I can just taste buttery biscuits, feel the hot sun on my face, and hear the windy rain. And it's not the over-descriptive kind of detail that drags on for ages, either. The voice contributed heavily to that. The easy-going, unique and fresh voice carries the tale along beautifully.

My only two complaints are that 1) It seemed that Amy and Henry don't know much about each other. They knew some, yes, but more would be nice, just to make the reader love them that much more. And 2) The ending is terribly vague. Terribly. I felt like there's still so much that needs explaining.

In a nutshell, though, The Clearing is a beautifully written, quick and lovely read. The setting is a wonderful back drop to the story, and the juxtaposition of Henry's time and Amy's is exponentially intriguing. Anywho, if you get a chance, pick this book up and give it a whirl. You won't regret it.

LINKS:

The VAGINA MONOLOGUES by Eve Ensler

Grade: A+

Obtained: Borrowed from a friend.

Age Appropriate? YES.


Review:

I love this book. I love the cover--so simple, so bold, like the play itself, and so satisfying to carry around and watch people do double-takes when they see that giant, shameless taboo word that graces the cover: VAGINA. Because that's ultimately what the book is about: Shamelessness. Empowerment. Acceptance. Self-discovery. Beauty.Womanhood. Humanity.

In these pages, Eve Ensler looks at vaginas as no one has before, in a way that exposes the joys of us all as well as the horrors too many women face while keeping up a witty, true dialogue that will make you laugh and cry and gasp and moan. There is so much power here, in the voices of all these women, and that power manifests itself in a worldwide movement--V-Day, a celebration of women, vaginas, and the Monologues that benefits women's organizations all over the world. Now, that is something--this is a book that is not only earth-shaking in its own right, but has turned into a physical force in our world. Wow.

I mean it when I say everyone should read this book. I read it. I'm going to make all of the women in my life read it. I will ask my boyfriend read it. And I'm going to ask you to read it, if you haven't already, or see it performed, or be in it. You will not come back from that experience unaffected.

Oh, and also, VAGINA!

LINKS:

V-Day
Become involved in V-Day in your community! 
Eve Ensler

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Mistwood by Leah Cypess

Grade: B+

Synopsis:

The Shifter is an immortal creature bound by an ancient spell to protect the kings of Samorna. When the realm is peaceful, she retreats to the Mistwood. But when she is needed she always comes.

Isabel remembers nothing. Nothing before the prince rode into her forest to take her back to the castle. Nothing about who she is supposed to be, or the powers she is supposed to have.

Prince Rokan needs Isabel to be his Shifter. He needs her ability to shift to animal form, to wind, to mist. He needs her lethal speed and superhuman strength. And he needs her loyalty—because without it, she may be his greatest threat.

Isabel knows that her prince is lying to her, but she can't help wanting to protect him from the dangers and intrigues of the court . . . until a deadly truth shatters the bond between them.

Now Isabel faces a choice that threatens her loyalty, her heart . . . and everything she thought she knew.

Rating:

Character Development: 6/10

Originality: 9/10

Overall Enjoyment: 7/10

Ending: 7/10

Voice: 6/10

Plot: 8/10

Setting: 6/10

Total Score: 49/ 70

Obtained: Library

Age Appropriate: PG

Cussing: None, I don't think.

Alcohol, Drugs, etc.: Brief mentions of wine

Sexual Content: Ambiguously mentioned in conversation.

Disturbing Images/ Violence: Murder, death, magic, blood and gore, etc.

Review:

At first, I really didn't think I would like this book. The voice for a majority of the story was so... animal-like. It kind of reminded me of those dogs with the voice boxes from the movie Up. Half the time I expected Isabel to turn her head, perk up her ears, and excitedly yelp "Squirrel!". Of course, it was understandable that the voice was somewhat animal-like, Isabel being a Shifter and all. But it just made it difficult for me to connect and relate to her.

It got better though, and soon I was too immersed in the plot to put the book down. There were some glorious plot twists that were completely unexpected. But Isabel's reaction to the surprising discoveries was somewhat distant and vague. Again, difficult for me to get into her character.

The castle intrigue, tricks, and deception was always interesting. The folklore aspect of the story was unique, and the whole concept of the Shifter was pretty different. Overall, this book was very original and kind of fresh because of it. However, it somehow didn't stick out to me. It isn't a book I was crazy about. I would still recommend you give it a try, though. You might really enjoy it!

LINKS:

Leah Cypess

Goodreads


Sunday, February 20, 2011

MAD LOVE contest winner!

Congrats to RUTHIE, lucky winner of Suzanne Selfors' Mad Love and Coffeehouse Angel!

Thanks to everyone for participating!

Friday, February 18, 2011

Mad Love by Suzanne Selfors

Grade: High B


Synopsis:

As the daughter of the best-selling Queen of Romance, life for sixteen-year-old Alice Amorous has been pretty good. But ever since her mother was secretly hospitalized for mental illness, Alice has been forced to maintain a brave front, answering fan letters, forging her mother's signature, telling the publisher that all is well. Now time is running out. The next book is overdue and the Queen can't write it. Alice needs a story for her mother--and she needs one now.

That's when she meets Errol, a strange boy who claims to be Cupid. He insists that Alice must write about the greatest love story in history, his tragic relationship with Psyche. Only Alice doesn't believe in Cupid, and she really wants to focus on her own love life and her new boyfriend, Tony. But when she begins to hear Errol's voice in her head, and sees things she can't explain, Alice must face the truth--that she's either inherited her mother's madness, or that Errol really is the god of love.

Rating:

Character Development: 6/10
Originality: 8/10
Overall Enjoyment: 7/10
Ending: 9/10
Voice: 6/10
Plot: 6/10
Setting: 9/10
Total Score: 53/70

Obtained? Free ARC provided by publisher (Walker Press)

Age Appropriate? PG


Cursing: Some mild.
Alcohol, Drugs, etc: Eh, not really. Maybe a few veiled references.
Sexual Content: None, though it does not hide from sex.
Disturbing Images/Violence: Severe mental illness/depression/bipolar disorder, child abandonment

Review:

This is definitely my least favorite Suzanne Selfors book. Usually, Selfors manages to take a weird, slightly cheesy chick-lit-mixed-with-a-touch-of-magic storyline that under most circumstances would be hard to read and make it witty, funny, and bright. Mad Love, while certainly cute at some points and by the end poignant and sweet, actually did end up being slightly hard to get into.

My biggest problem was the heroine, Alice. Most of her narration is laced with alternating bouts of self-pity and self-congratulation mixed into the disjointed plot. The book didn't flow very well, with ideas being mentioned and forgotten, details being overlooked, and characters fading in and out of importance. The Cupid element (though the story of Cupid and Psyche is a cool one integrated very well throughout the book) threw me off a bit and was at times quite stomach-turning (such as every time someone got shot with Cupid's invisible arrows of drooly, panting, possessing "love"), which, while the effect is intended, I felt like it was a bit drawn out and overdone.

But once you get past a certain point, the book definitely picks up. Alice becomes more human and reasonable, the other characters solidify and develop, and things start to come together. By the end, the reader has developed genuine sympathy for them that makes the final scenes touching and tender.

LINKS:


Suzanne Selfors
Coffeehouse Angel
Saving Juliet

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Book Showcase: The Gardener

This is a book that I've had in my reading pile for a long while now and, unfortunately, haven't gotten around to reading. I'm really very sad that I've abandoned it to collect dust on my shelf. At some point, I will actually read it!
However, to give you an idea, a book showcase for The Gardener by S. A. Bodeen:

Brief Synopsis:
15-year-old Mason stumbles on an evil experiment that render teens into autotrophs, and is soon on the run with one of them, a beautiful girl whose fate is controlled by the Gardener.

Note: I have read several different declarations that if you read this book, you shouldn't read the synopsis on the back cover. It will reveal too much.

Things I'm reading about The Gardener:
"The Gardener offers a quick paced, thrill ride of emotion. With an amazing protagonist, whom you can't not care about and a subject that leaves you thinking..." -Book Crazy
"compelling" and "extremely shocking" -Loony-Reads
"The overall premise may intrigue you, but I fear that the amount of actual science fiction / futuristic elements may disappoint." -Kate (on Goodreads)
"engrossing thriller mixed with scientific ethics" -Tara SG (on Goodreads)
Some Links for you to learn more:

Monday, February 14, 2011

The Iron Daughter by Julie Kagawa

Grade: A+

Synopsis:
Half Summer faery princess, half human, Meghan has never fit in anywhere. Deserted by the Winter prince she thought loved her, she is prisoner to the Winter faery queen. As war looms between Summer and Winter, Meghan knows that the real danger comes from the Iron fey—ironbound faeries that only she and her absent prince have seen. But no one believes her.

Worse, Meghan's own fey powers have been cut off. She's stuck in Faery with only her wits for help. Trusting anyone would be foolish. Trusting a seeming traitor could be deadly. But even as she grows a backbone of iron, Meghan can't help but hear the whispers of longing in her all-too-human heart.

Rating:
Character Development: 8/10
Originality: 9/10
Overall Enjoyment: 10/ 10
Ending: 8/10
Voice: 9/10
Plot: 9/10
Setting: 10/10
Total Score: 63/ 70

Obtained: Bought

Age Appropriate? PG13
Language: Some cursing
Drugs, Alcohol, Etc.: None
Sexual Content: None
Disturbing Images/ Violence: Just typical crazy fairy fighting, blood, psycho power-seeking people, and boogie monsters. :)

Review:
I am officially thoroughly excited about this series. It has progressed so much since the last one. The characters (who were awesome in the first book) are even more amazing now. The world, so absolutely imaginative, seems to pluck me right out of my day to day life and toss me into the whirlwind of Faery.

The Iron Daughter has all the same fantastic elements as The Iron King, but with a lot more drama thrown in, keeping things interesting and tense. Meghan's romance troubles are as abundant as always, the love triangle getting even more tightly wound. The enmity between the Summer and Winter courts reaches its breaking point and the Fey world is upended. And then there' the brooding Winter Prince's whacked up familial issues... Seriously messed up, dude.

Let's talk about Meghan. She's a heroine in the best of ways. She's brave, loyal, and has some spunk, but she's also emotional (as, let's face it... girls tend to be). She cries when she feels heartbroken, she weeps over the loss of a friend, and she follows her heart wherever it leads her. Her voice carries the story along wonderfully.

All the characters have very distinct and differing speech patterns, adding so much to the reader's understanding of their personalities. Which is a quality that I just love a lot.

Ash and Puck. Should I get into this? No, I probably shouldn't get into this. It is what it is. So... Ash and Puck... make of that what you will.

There are still debts to be paid and duels to be fought in this whizzing fantasy. I am so looking forward to the next installment!

LINKS:

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Fallen Grace by Mary Hooper

Grade: A+

Synopsis:

Life has been nothing but unfair to Grace Parkes and her sister. Penniless, the two orphans manage to stay alive--but only barely, like so many on the streets of Victorian London. And Grace must bear a greater heartbreak, having become pregnant from terrible circumstances and then given birth to a stillborn baby. But the infant's death sets Grace on a new path, bringing her into contact with people who hold both riches and power. A great fraud has been perpetrated on Grace and her sister, and they are the secret recipients of a most unusual legacy--if only they can find the means to claim it.

Rating:

Character Development: 10/10
Originality:8/10
Overall Enjoyment: 8/10
Ending: 6/10
Voice: 9/10
Plot: 10/10
Setting: 10/10
Total Score: 61/70

Obtained: Free ARC provided by publisher.

Age Appropriate? PG-13

Cursing: Limited and mild.
Alcohol, Drugs, etc: Some drinking/drunkenness, some vague references to drug use.
Sexual Content: Blatant references to rape, prostitution
Disturbing Images/Violence: Rape, poverty, child labor and abuse

Review:

A lovely adventure into real-life Victorian London. Grace and Lily were both strong, beautiful characters with a great story full of interesting characters. There was never a dull moment, but the book wasn't overly-consuming. The setting was impeccably crafted, even the squalor and poverty of the London slums. Fascinating and enthralling.

I loved the refreshing take on Victorian London--no magic, little politics, yet still intriguing. I've never read much about the Victorian funeral trade, but it provided a grim background to this grim tale. Hooper does not romanticize the era, but she treats it with the respect of a historian. Well done!

My only complaint about this book is the rather abrupt ending. I do not think there will be a sequel (though I could be wrong) but it seemed to me that, though all the problems were resolved and all the mysteries revealed, we never see Grace's reaction to any of it. We never learn what she decides to do, what her life becomes. And while, yes, the resolution was complete, I cared about her and her sister enough to crave seeing their happiness after so many pages of trial and suffering. As the book was rather short for the breadth of the story it told, I think Hooper could have continued just a bit further.

LINKS:

Mary Hooper



For you aspiring writers out there...

“No one can tell your unique story but you, and you will be amazed at how your voice can not only change your future, but will inspire people, near and far, to change our world for the better.”

Concern's Global Writing Competition challenges students and adults from all walks of life to enter and submit an article in which they write about a global issue in the role of a seasoned journalist. Winning articles and selected entries will be published online and in a 2011 book published by Concern and winners will "be among an outstanding community of activists, students, writers and everyday heroes whose words empower and echo around the world".


Purty cool opportunity, people!


Prizes include: a laptop computer, a Kindle e-reader and an MP3 player. Winning essays and selected entries will be published in the Concern Creative Writing Competition book, as well as be featured on Concern’s website and blog.


To find out the details and enter the contest, visit www.concern.net/writingcompetition.


Check it out!

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Un-Review of Halo by Alexandra Adornetto

Sometimes I read a book that is absolutely useless to me. I don't enjoy it. I don't care about it. I don't want to finish it. So I don't. Being unable to review a book I didn't actually finish (wouldn't be fair), I give you my UN-Review of Halo by Alexandra Adornetto.

Synopsis:
Three angels- Gabriel, the warrior; Ivy, the healer; and Bethany, the youngest and most human- are sent by Heaven to bring good to a world falling under the influence of darkness. They must work hard to conceal their luminous glow, superhuman powers, and, most dangerous of all, their wings, all the while avoiding all human attachments.

Then Bethany meets Xavier Woods, and neither of them is able to resist the attraction between them. Gabriel and Ivy do everything in their power to intervene, but the bond between Xavier and Bethany seems too strong.

The angel’s mission is urgent, and dark forces are threatening. Will love ruin Bethany or save her?

Completed: 252 pages out of 484

IMPRESSIONS:
Within twenty pages of this book, I knew it wasn't going to be amazing. Beth's narration is shallow, naive, and quite annoying. Reading this book is kind of like watching a bad Lifetime movie. You know it's going to be mediocre and you expect it to be, you start watching it, see that it's not good, but for some strange reason, continue to watch it anyway. So that's how I made it through 252 pages. I was entertained to say the least.

But by 252, even the entertainment factor had worn out. The plot development is slower than 6 o'clock traffic. The characters are flat and, to me, not in the least bit likable. The heavenly mission factor (that should be leading the plot along) is shoved completely into the background as Beth's relationship with Xavier takes center stage. When Beth isn't with Xavier, her every pea-brained thought is about him. When she is with him, their grossly cheesy dialogue and unnecessary PDA is just... ew.

The cover, though, is absolutely beautiful! Unfortunately, the book really disappointed me. Of course, I didn't finish it... so maybe it pulled itself together in the end. I encourage you to still give it a shot if it sounds like your type!

LINKS:

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

The False Princess by Eilis O'Neal

Grade: A

Synopsis:

Princess and heir to the throne of Thorvaldor, Nalia has led a privileged life at court. But everything changes when she learns, just after her sixteenth birthday, that she is a false princess, a stand-in for the real Nalia, who has been hidden away for her protection. Cast out with little more than the clothes on her back, the girl now called Sinda must leave behind the city, her best friend, Kiernan, and the only life she’s ever known.

Sent to live with her only surviving relative, a cold, scornful woman with little patience for her newfound niece, Sinda proves inept at even the simplest tasks. Then she discovers that magic runs through her veins – long-suppressed, dangerous magic that she must learn to control – and she realizes that she will never learn to be just a simple village girl.

Sinda returns to the city to seek answers. Instead, she rediscovers the boy who refused to forsake her, and uncovers a secret that could change the course of Thorvaldor’s history, forever.


Rating:
Character Development: 6/10
Originality: 8/10
Overall Enjoyment: 9/10
Ending: 8/10
Voice: 7/10
Plot: 7/10
Setting: 9/10
Total Score: 54/70

Obtained: ARC from Egmont

Age Appropriate? G
Language: Not much cursing
Drugs, Alcohol, etc: None
Sexual Content: None
Disturbing Images/ Violence: Nothing too bad, just some blood and bruises

Review:
Fairytale princess stories... you gotta love 'em! With magic, conspiracy, love, and adventure, this fantasy is bright and unique, but familiar enough to be a good friend.

Bookish, determined Sinda is definitely a likable character, but her narration sometimes goes in loops or seems annoyingly childish. Kiernan, the good and dependable goofy best friend is always entertaining (and his whole "I'm totally in love but she's totally oblivious" thing is super cutesie). Philanthra, the kooky and frail witch is a lovable hoot. But all these faces lack more depth, which sometimes really bothered me. However! The story is very fairytale-esque, so the characters (more colorful than real), fit in with the style perfectly. Basically, I'm just being a whiner.

The plot and the setting are just as colorful as the characters. Secret doors, cryptic prophecies, unsolved mysteries... yay yay yay! The False Princess is a wonderfully enjoyable read.

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

The 2011 Book Drum Tournament



Book Drum is a cool site dedicated to bringing books to life with pictures, videos, maps, and music. If you haven't checked it out yet, you definitely should.

It is now time for their 2011 Tournament.
If you are 18 or older, you have a chance to win £1,000 by making a profile for a book.
Profiles include:

Bookmarks: page-by-page commentary and illustration of the text

Setting: description and illustration of the main places or themes of the book

Glossary: foreign, invented and tricky words deciphered

Summary: objective synopsis of the book

Review: subjective analysis and evaluation of the book

Author: biographical information, interview videos, links and photos


Pretty nifty! More information for the tournament can be found here.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Jenna and Jonah's Fauxmance by Emily Franklin and Brendan Halpin

This book will be available on February 1st. 


Grade: B-

Fans of romance don't need to look any further than the fauxmance brewing between teen idols Charlie Tracker and Fielding Withers--known on their hit TV show as Jenna and Jonah, next-door neighbors flush with the excitement of first love. But it's their off-screen relationship that has helped cement their fame, as passionate fans follow their every PDA. The only problem? Their off-screen romance is one big publicity stunt and Charlie and Fielding can't stand to be in the same room. But even when cameras stop rolling, the show must o on, and on, and on...

Until the pesky paparazzi blow their cover, and Charlie and Fielding must disappear to weather the media storm. It's not until their far away from the Hollywood circuit that they realize there's more to each of them than shiny hair and a winning smile.

Rating: 

Character Development: 7/10
Originality: 6/10
Overall Enjoyment: 7/10
Ending: 8/10
Voice: 6/10
Plot: 5/10
Setting: 6/10
Total Score: 45/70

Obtained: Free ARC provided by publisher.

Age Appropriate? PG-13

Cursing: Some, but nothing too explicit.
Drugs, Alcohol, etc: References to illegal drug smoking and drunkenness.
Sexual Content: Some lewd humor and references, but no actual scenes.
Disturbing Images/Violence: None.

Review:

The first thing I must say about this book is that it was not nearly as stupid as I thought it would be. Based on the cover and the synopsis, I expected a gag-worthy read with no real substance. But...I was surprised. While not an earth-shakingly profound story, Jenna and Jonah's was intelligent and honest, without all that sappy stuff many "romance" books provide.

Honestly, if you're looking for romance, I would not suggest this book. It is about Charlie and Fielding's developing relationship, it's true, but there was not an excess of sexy scenes or too much romantic tension. For me, this was an enormous plus. Somehow, this book managed to be not cheesy, with the storyline progressing in perfect harmony with their relationship. Though sometimes the two characters seemed a bit out of sync (a product, I think, of the dual authorship of the novel), they were both fairly likable, mostly normal, and human. And the product was a very, very sweet story.

Now, if you're worried about the whole "Hollywood" aspect of the story, don't. Franklin and Halpin certainly don't paint the world of teen stars and television in an overdramaticized or romantic light. And while I know very little about that industry, it seemed to me to be more realistic than many interpretations. Still, it was a bit difficult for me at first to empathize with two people who were rich, famous, beautiful, and eventually, in love, but after a while it became clear that this life has its own kind of trials and tribulations.Though predictable in some sense and very nonthreatening, Jenna and Jonah's played out nicely, and it was certainly not a waste of time. Will I read it again? Probably not, but the book definitely has its place, and is a very worthy contribution to its genre.

LINKS:

Emily Franklin
Brendan Halpin